Parent Education

Parents and Guardians: Learn how to be an effective advocate for your children

[Photo of parent and child attending IMANI event]

Parent involvement is crucial to get children to take their schoolwork seriously and commit to participating in academic support programs. If this is something you struggle with, learn how IMANI can help. Read more

Parent involvement is key. Are you as involved as you would like to be?

Cultural barriers, family conflicts, personal problems, or financial struggles can make it hard for parents or guardians to be involved in their children’s education. Even when you are determined to stay involved, it is often challenging to understand the best ways to advocate for your child and know what support services and resources are available at every grade level.

[Photo of parent and child meeting with JoAnn McCullough]

How IMANI can help

IMANI strives to keep families informed about educational issues that may affect their children’s performance in school. IMANI staff, program facilitators, and trained volunteers provide valuable information and advice to parents of children enrolled in IMANI programs through family meetings, phone calls, emails and newsletters, and special events throughout the school year.

Through these various channels, IMANI addresses a variety of issues and concerns that help parents learn how to:

  • Choose the most appropriate courses for their children
  • Help students stay on track with class assignments and graduation requirements
  • Find in-school and community-based academic support resources
  • Communicate effectively with school administrators and teaching staff
  • Understand how student performance is measured
  • Navigate the public school system at every level

IMANI also participates in district-wide events such as Parenting and Mega-Skills workshops and the Montclair High School College Fair where we acquaint parents and guardians with IMANI programs and services and affirm the value of educational support programs in improving minority achievement and increasing enrollment in competitive colleges.

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